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Evolution of an atmospheric boundary layer at a tropical semi-arid station, Anand during boreal summer month of May - A case study

Nagar, SG and Tyagi, A and Seetaramayya, P and Singh, SS (2000) Evolution of an atmospheric boundary layer at a tropical semi-arid station, Anand during boreal summer month of May - A case study. Current Science, 78 (5). pp. 595-600.

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Abstract

The evolution of an Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) over a semi-arid land station, Anand, (22°35â²N, 72°55â²E, 45.1 m asl) in India, during the summer month of May, is examined using surface meteorological and radiosonde temperature and humidity data collected during LASPEX-97 for a 5-day period from 13-17 May 1997. These 5 days remained undisturbed, and clear sky weather conditions prevailed. However, the data obtained on these days are helpful in understanding the diurnal variation of the ABL over a land station. There are 5 observations per day at an interval of 3 h beginning with 0530 IST. The 0530 IST ascents are chosen to find out the initial ABL heights which exhibit the nocturnal cooling conditions. It is observed from the analysis of θv, θe, θes, q, and P profiles that the nocturnal boundary layer is stable with an inversion close to the ground. The top of an inversion layer is characterized by a θe minimum and a θes maximum. After dawn, the ABL grows to a height of 827 m at 0830 IST. Aloft, a residual layer up to 3200 m is observed. The daytime strong insolation causes formation of an unstable boundary layer close to the ground at 1130 IST with an elevated stable layer between 550 and 930 m. It is only by 1430 IST that the stable layer gets completely wiped out and a convective mixed layer develops up to a height of 3280 m. Lack of moisture inhibits formation of clouds. Hence the ABL at a semi-arid station like Anand is stable in the morning with residual layer aloft and develops into a dry convective boundary layer in the afternoon and evening. Growth of the convective boundary layer (CBL) is observed to be very rapid as it reaches a height up to 3280 m by the afternoon.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to Indian Academy of Science.
Subjects: Meteorology and Climatology
Depositing User: IITM Library
Date Deposited: 06 Mar 2015 04:31
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2015 04:31
URI: http://moeseprints.incois.gov.in/id/eprint/1613

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